Skip Navigation
Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthCAAT

Testicular Toxicology In Vitro Models: a CAAT t4 Workshop

October 26 & 27, 2011
Mt. Washington Conference Center
5801 Smith Avenue, Baltimore, MD USA

Sponsored by HESI Developmental and Reproductive Toxicology (DART) and
the Johns Hopkins Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing (CAAT)

Mission Statement:

The mammalian testis is a tissue of highly-structured micro-environments, whose importance in the process of spermatogenesis is unknown, and all of which are destroyed by putting the cells into primary culture. While the microenvironment changes in culture are largely unknown, what is known is that few of the current methods of culturing cells from the mammalian testis produce mature germ cells, and none produce them in quantity or in consistently repeatable units (such as ?48 wells of spermatogenesis?). There is a large un-met need for such methods in at least two situations: 1) in pharmaceutical discovery and development, in the case where a lead compound produces testis damage and such a tool would be invaluable for screening possible backup compounds using less compound, and 2) in screening environmental compounds, where the number of chemicals with unknown biological activity is vastly larger than the resources to test them in animals. The methods developed to date can support germ cell viability and development only for a very short duration, and none can capture or support the last half of spermatogenesis, or combine spermatogenesis with steroidogenesis.

Tissue engineering offers another approach to this problem. The use of highly structured microenvironments such as those routinely considered and used by tissue engineers might do a better job of supporting spermatogenesis in culture. This workshop is intended to bring together experts in testis physiology and toxicology with tissue engineers to brainstorm ways of creating environments in vitro which might be more conducive to maintaining spermatogenesis. The workshop will feature active discussion sessions, and end with short presentations from funding agencies who might support this work. The goal is to finish our short workshop with ideas for 2-7 different models which could feasibly be tried in the near future.

PROGRAM: Wednesday, October 26

8:00-8:30
Breakfast

8:30-8:35
Welcome and Introduction
Thomas Hartung, Johns Hokins CAAT

8:35-8:40
Introduction to HESI and the DART Committee
James Kim, HESI

8:40-8:50
Welcome—"Why We Are Here and What We Hope to Accomplish"
Louise Saldutti, Merck

8:50-9:15
Review of May 2011 Testicular Toxicity Workshop—US Perspective
Jennifer Sasaki, Alkermes

9:15-9:45
Need for Alternative Models for Testicular Toxicity—European Perspective
Aldert Piersma, RIVM Testing

9:45-10:00
Break

10:00-10:30
Overview of Male Reproductive Physiology
Terry Brown, Johns Hopkins University

10:30-11:00
Overview of Spermatogenesis and Steroidogenesis
Paul Cooke, University of Florida

11:00-11:30
Overview of Testicular Tox Models
Mary Hixon, Brown University

11:30-12:00
Overview—In Vitro Testicular Tox Models

Elaine Faustman, University of Washington

12:00-12:30
Is That All There Is? Lessons Learned From Current In Vitro Models of Testicular Toxicity
Sarah Campion, Pfizer, Inc. In Vitro Models of Testicular Toxicity

12:30-1:30
Lunch

1:30-2:00
Industry applications for Biomedical Engineering
David O'Dowd, Draper Lab

2:00-2:30

Biomimetic Material and Mechanical Stimuli for Functional Bone Tissue Engineering
Elizabeth Loboa, University of North Carolina/NCSU

2:30-3:00
Advances in Biomedical Engineering—Liver
Hanry Yu, National University of Singapore

3:00-3:30
Advances in Biomedical Engineering - Kidney
Tessa DesRochers, Tufts University

3:30-3:45
Break

3:45-5:00
Panel/Group Discussion
L. Earl Gray, US EPA

5:00-5:30 pm
Wrap-Up and Preparation for Day 2

PROGRAM: Thursday, October 27

8:00-8:30
Breakfast

8:30-9:00
Welcome—Recap of Yesterday's Session
TBA

9:00-10:00
Assessment of Testicular Toxicity: What Have We Learned and What are the Challenges for the Future?
Paul Foster, NIEHS

10:00-10:15
Break

10:15-11:30
Funding Opportunities

  • NIH/NIEHS
    Elizabeth Maull
  • FDA
    Suzanne Fitzpatrick
  • EPA
    Meta Bonner
  • NSF
    TBA

11:30-12:00
Wrap-up
Thomas Hartung, Johns Hopkins CAAT

Registration Form

Name

Organization

Mailing Address

Email Address

Telephone

Fax

REGISTRATION FEES

$100—Early registration (through October 7, 2011)

$200—after October 7

Complimentary registration for CAAT sponsors, CAAT associates, Federal agencies, animal welfare organizations, and
Johns Hopkins Faculty/Students through October 7. 

Note: Registration confirmation will be sent my email.

PAYMENT OPTIONS:

Check (Please make checks payable to: JHU-CAAT)

Credit Card: ____ VISA ____ MasterCard ____ American Express

Account number:

Expiration date:

Name of cardholder:

Signature of cardholder:

Register by:

Fax: 410-614-2871
email: caat@jhsph.edu / mprincip@jhsph.edu

Address: CAAT
615 N Wolfe St, W7032
Baltimore MD 21205

interest