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Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public HealthCAAT
 

9th Annual 3Rs Symposium: Collaboration to Improve Animal Welfare and Rigorous Results

3Rs of animal welfare: replace, reduce, refine


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Wednesday & Thursday, June 22-23, 2022 | 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.
 
Friday, June 24, 2022 - Refinement Workshop (extra ticket required) | 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 

This event has been submitted for RACE Credits.

This symposium will focus on reduction, refinement and replacement methods to improve laboratory animal welfare while maintaining or improving scientific results. The refinement sessions describe cutting-edge advancements in laboratory animal welfare, methods to achieve sound scientific results, and 3Rs success stories.There also will be panel discussions about the presentations, laboratory animal adoption programs; international perspectives on 3Rs implementation in Asia, Africa, and South America; and an optional demonstration of refinement techniques.

NOTE: If you need sign language interpreter, please let us know..

Questions? Contact Camila S. Januario cjanuar1@jhu.edu

***Link to online access will be sent 24 hours before the event.***

 


 

Day 1 | June 22, 2022

8:30 – 8:45 a,m.ET - Welcome by Organizers

Session 1: Refinements for Better Science and Better Welfare

Moderator: Kathrin Herrmann

 

8:45 – 9:45 a.m. ET | Coordinating the 3Rs and the 3Vs in Animal Research

o Hanno Würbel, University of Bern, Switzerland

9:45 – 10:45: a.m. ET | How Wild Mouse Gut Microbiota Promote Host Fitness and Makes a Better Model for Immune System Research

o Stephan Rosshart, University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany

10:45 – 11:00 a.m. ET | Break

11:00 AM – 12:00 p.m. ET | Mixed Strain Housing Using a Split-plot Design to Promote Reduction and Refinement While Maintaining Statistical Power

o Mike Walker, Canadian Council on Animal Care

12:00 - 12:45 p.m. ET | Lunch Break

Moderator: Nicolette Petervary

12:45 – 1:45 p.m. ET | Mouse Models for Infectious Disease Studies: The Collaborative Cross Project and Outbred Strains

o Mark Heise, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

1:45 – 3:15 p.m. ET | Keynote Panel Discussion Day 1: What Happens After Research? Discussion of adoption programs.

o Robert Gump, Food and Drug Administration

o Alice Huang, Department of Veterans Affairs

o Jess Izzi, Johns Hopkins University

3:15 – 4:00 p.m. ET | Q&A

 


 

Day 2 | June 23, 2022

Session 2: Collaborations to Improve Animal Welfare and Scientific Rigor

Moderator: Caroline Krall

8:30 –10:30 a.m. ET | Keynote Panel Discussion Day 2: Success Stories: International Collaborations to Solve Local Animal Welfare Issues

o 8:30 – 8:50 a.m. ET | Francis Fakoya, founder of ACURET, member of ICLAS Africa Regional Committee

o 8:50 – 9:10 a.m. ET | Ekaterina Rivera, vice president of FESSACAL, secretary-general of ICLAS America Regional Committee

o 9:10 –9:30 a.m. ET | Qin Chuan, vice president of AFLAS, Ppesident of CALAS, Director of ILAS

o 9:30 –9:50 a.m. ET | Ouajdi Souilem, Tunisian National  Member of ICLAS, chair of ICLAS Africa Regional Committee, president of Ethical Committee on Animal Experimentation. CEEA- ENMV Sidi Thabet

o 9:50 –10:10 a.m. ET | Montip Gettayacamin, senior director, Southeast Asia, AAALAC International

10:30 – 10:45 a.m. ET | Break

10:45 – 11:45 AM ET | NC3Rs Interactive 3Rs Self-Assessment Tools (with demonstration)

o Jessica Eddy, NC3Rs

11:45 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. ET | Lunch Break

Session 3: Refinements for Better Science and Better Welfare Part 2

Moderator: Jessie Carder

12:30: – 1:30 p.m. ET | ICCVAM Interagency Initiatives on Consideration and Validation of Alternative Methods

o Nicole Kleinstreuer, NIH, NIEHS

1:30 – 2:30 p.m. ET | Training Mice in Non-Aversive Techniques for Improved Refinement: Syringe Feeding as an Alternative to Gavage

o Caroline Krall, Johns Hopkins University

2:30 – 3:30 p.m. ET | Implementing Non-aversive Handling in Mice

o Donna L Goldsteen

3:30 – 4:25 p.m. ET | Q&A

4:25 – 4:30 p.m. ET | Symposium Wrap-up 

 


 

Day 3 | June 24, 2022 | Refinement Workshop

9:00 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. | How to implement 3R-based Change Within Biomedical Research Institutions (extra registration required)

Eric Hutchinson, Caroline Krall and Lydia Hopper, Johns Hopkins University

 

Speaker Bios

Qin Chuan small

Chuan, Qin AFLAS, CALAS, ILAS, China Keynote Panel Discussion Day 2: Success Stories: International Collaborations to Solve Local Animal Welfare Issues

Dr. Qin Chuan, a medical doctor and researcher, is the Director of the Institute of Laboratory Animal Sciences, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, expert of Medical Sciences and expert of special allowance by State Council. She received her doctorate in pathology and pathophysiology in 2006. She is mainly engaged in experimental pathology development, and has established a series of neurodegenerative disease models, China's largest resource bank of animal models of human diseases, Comparative Medical Technology Platform and National Platform for Animal Model of Infectious Diseases. In addition, she has been worked on the development of animal models of human diseases, the research of disease mechanism and the application of drug development models for a long time, and created the discipline of medical comparative medicine. The relevant representative research results were published in the journals of Nature Medcine, Nature Microbial, and Nature Communication, respectively. She published 283 papers as the first or corresponding author, 110 SCI papers of Nature Microbiol, Nature Med, and the like included, which were cited for 1595 times. She has obtained 10 authorized invention patents, and she was the editorinchief of 17 monographs and 5 textbooks, 3 industry training materials, training 81 graduate students and postdoctoral. She also leaded establishment of 152 standards and won 18 awards of science and technology (including the First National Innovation Top Prize, the third prize of National Prize for Progress in Science and Technology), achieving the honors of the National "March 8th" Red Banner, National Excellent Science and Technology Workers, etc.

 

Jessica Eddy

Eddy, Jessica NC3Rs, UK NC3Rs Interactive 3Rs SelfAssessment Tools

Dr. Eddy completed her PhD in Behavioural Genetics at Cardiff University (UK) in 2014. Post PhD, Jess obtained research funding positions at the charity Breast Cancer Now and then Cancer Research UK, where she managed a portfolio of grant applications for the Clinical Research Committee. Following this, Jess took up a role as a Research Coordinator at Imperial College London, before joining the UK’ s National Centre for the Replacement, Refinement and Reduction of Animals in Research (NC3Rs) as a Regional Programme Manager for the GW4 Alliance in 2018. Her role supports the application of the 3Rs across the universities of Bath, Bristol, Cardiff and Exeter. These regional posts were created to expand 3Rs activities at UK research institutions and to provide dedicated on the ground support. Recently, Jess has been promoting the use of the 3Rs self assessment tools, created to support research groups and research institutions to track, evaluate and benchmark their 3Rs activity.

 

Francis Fakoya

Fakoya, Francis ACURET, ICLAS Africa Regional Committee, Nigeria

Keynote Panel Discussion Day 2: Success Stories: International Collaborations to Solve Local Animal Welfare Issues

Dr. Francis Adelade G.O. Fakoya is a passionate medically qualified healthcare professional educator, researcher and mentor with almost three decades of higher education experience. He holds a medical degree from Obafemi Awolowo University, IleIfe; along with MSc. in Human Anatomy, and PhD in Cell Biology and Anatomy from the same institution, during which he was visiting scholar at the University of Leipzig, Germany. He was the first director of the Institute of Health Research and Postgraduate Training at the new College of Health Sciences at Delta State University in Abraka, Nigeria. Fakoya pioneered the Grenada Brain Bee Challenge, a grassroot Neuroscience public awareness and promotion program against substance and alcohol abuse through a series of competitions amongst secondary school students serving as National Director in St. George ’ s, Grenada. He serves on the Board of Trustees and is the Principal of Animal Care and Use in Research, Education and Testing [ACURET.ORG], a multinational interdisciplinary organization of professionals promoting humane animal care and use for scientific purposes in developing countries, consulting and training on lab animal welfare for scientists, veterinarians, medical and health care investigators and graduate students, assuring quality of animalbased experimentation in health research, in particular among Nigerian universities.

 

Gettayacamin

Gettayacamin, Montip AAALAC International Southeast Asia, Thailand Keynote Panel Discussion Day 2: Success Stories: International Collaborations to Solve Local Animal Welfare Issues

Dr. Montip Gettayacamin is Senior Director for South this role she supports AAALAC International ’East Asia at AAALAC International. In s accreditation program to advance research animal welfare in the region and assists institutions to attain accreditation. Dr. Montip received her veterinary medicine degree from Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand in 1984. She is a diplomate American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine. She has over 30 years of experience in Laboratory Animal Medicine and previously served as Assistant Chief for Research and Laboratory Animal Medicine, and Senior Research Scientist at Department of Veterinary Medicine, United States Army Medical Component, Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (USAMCAFRIMS), Bangkok, Thailand. The program has attained AAALAC International accreditation since 1999. She has authored and coauthored more than 50 scientific publications. She translated the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, National Research Council (NRC, 1996 and 2011), the Occupational Health and Safety in the Care and Use of Research Animals (NRC, 1997), and the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Research and Teaching (FASS, 2010) to Thai. Dr. Montip is a reviewer of Journal of Visualized Experiments (JoVE) and a member, Editorial Board, Animal Models and Experimental Medicine (AMEM) Journal. She is a former member of AAALAC International Council on Accreditation. She has served on International Council for laboratory Animal Science (ICLAS) Governing Board and the Chair of Asia Regional Committee for 2015-2023.

 

Robert Gump

Gump, Robert Food and Drug Administration, USA Keynote Panel Discussion Day 1: What Happens After Research?

Dr. Robert Gump supports the FDA Animal Welfare Council and One Health initiative. He is a graduate of Louisiana State University with an interdisciplinary science degree with a preveterinary medicine focus, is an animal research facility operations expert and maintains federal government certification as a FACCOR II (contract specialist). In addition to managing AAALACi accredited animal care facilities for over 20 years at major universities, DoD and FDA, Bob has established and chaired an Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) for a CRO and been a member of two additional IACUCs. He served in the Louisiana Army National Guard for over 10 years as a medical service corps officer to include appointments as a medical company commander and the physical security, training and nuclear, biological, chemical (NBC) officer, and a Parish liaison for disaster operations. Bob holds professional memberships in NCAB, AALAS, LAMA and VoE N; and has served as president for AALAS branches in LA and FL and on the LAMA board.

 

mark heise

Heise, Mark University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, USAMouse Models for Infectious Disease Studies: The Collaborative Cross Project and Outbred Strains

Dr. Heise is a Professor in the Departments of Genetics and Microbiology and Immunology within the University of North Carolina School of Medicine.  Dr. Heise received his B.A. in Biology from St. Olaf College in 1991 and his Ph.D. in Immunology from Washington University in St. Louis in 1996.  He conducted postgraduate research at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill on viral pathogenesis from 1997 to 2000, prior to joining the faculty at UNC.  The Heise laboratory uses molecular virology, immunology, biochemical, and quantitative genetics methodologies to understand the biology and pathogenesis of emerging alphaviruses, coronaviruses, and influenza viruses.  Our goal is to use this information to facilitate the development of safer and more effective vaccines and antiviral therapies against these important emerging pathogens.

 

donna goldsteen

Goldsteen, Donna Implementing NonUSA Aversive Handling in Mice

Donna Goldsteen is recently retired from the laboratory animal science field. Her previous role for the last 18 years was Director of the Animal Sciences program at the AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals ’ Gaithersburg site.  At AstraZeneca the Animal Sciences & Technologies program supports early discovery sciences in the areas of Oncology, Cardiovascular and Metabolic Disease, Respiratory and Inflammatory Disease, and Vaccines & Immune Therapies. Donna was a member of the AstraZeneca Council on Science and Animal Welfare and worked to implement improvements in the animal program relating to reduction of animal numbers and refinements in animal welfare. During her career she has also worked in CROs, government (NIH) research and the biotech pharmaceutical industry. She has been actively involved with her local AALAS branch, NCAB, in multiple positions including Secretary and President, and with National AALAS as a Board of Trustee member and Committee Chair. She is currently an AAALAC Ad Hoc Consultant.  Outside of work Donna and her therapy dog Link, volunteer their time with an organization called Fidos for Freedom that brings dogs to hospitals, rehabilitation facilities, schools and businesses to provide pet therapy to people in need.Department of Veterans Affairs, USA

alice huang

Huang, Alice Keynote Panel Discussion Day 1: What Happens After Research?

Dr. Alice Huang, PhD, is the Deputy for IACUC (Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee) Guidance in the office of the Chief Veterinary Medical Officer (CVMO) of the Office of Research and Development of the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA ORD). In this role, she serves as liaison between the office of the CVMO and other agencies involved in oversight of animal research, including the VA Office of Research Oversight, the Office of Laboratory Animal Welfare at the National Institutes of Health, and the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service of the US Department of Agriculture, as well as with the accreditation organization, AAALAC International. She is also the primary point of contact in the office of the CVMO for field personnel at each of the 70+ VA stations that are responsible for VA animal research, serving as a resource with regard to oversight of that research. Dr. Huang earned an Sc.B. degree in Biophysics at Brown University, and a Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics (focus: distribution of myocardial perfusion during exercise) at the University of Washington. Following postdoctoral research in cardiovascular physiology at the Institute for Applied Physiology at the University of Freiburg in Germany, in the Department of Pharmacology at Georgetown University, and in the Department of Surgery at Emory University, she was on the faculty of the Physiology Department of the Morehouse School of Medicine, and conducted research in the Division of Cardiology of Emory University, before taking her current position in 2006. She earned the designation of Certified Professional in IACUC Administration (CPIA) in 2007 and served on the CPIA Council, which manages the eligibility and recertification criteria and the content of the examinations for the CPIA program.

 

jess izzi

Izzi, Jess Johns Hopkins University, USA Keynote Panel Discussion Day 1: What Happens After Research?

Dr. Jessica Izzi received her Master of Laboratory Animal Science degree from Drexel University in 2007. She graduated from Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in 2013, after which she completed the laboratory animal postdoctoral training program at Johns Hopkins University. She became a diplomate of the American College of Laboratory Animal Medicine in 2016. From 20162018, she worked as a clinical veterinarian and surgeon in the Division of Veterinary Resources at the NIH. She returned to Johns Hopkins in 2018 as a faculty veterinarian. There, she oversees the large animal medicine and surgery program, the clinical postdoctoral training program, and the adoption program. Over the last 4 years she has refined and revolutionized the adoption program at Johns Hopkins, opening the doors to adoption for animals that previously would not have been considered adoptable.

 

caroline krall

Krall, Caroline Johns Hopkins University, USA

Training Mice in Non-Aversive Techniques for Improved Refinement: Syringe Feeding as an Alternative to Gavage

Dr. Caroline Krall obtained her veterinary degree at the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies, and MSc in Applied Animal Behaviour and Animal Welfare at the University of Edinburgh, in which she studied the diagnosis of postrescued longtraumatic stress disorder in tailed macaques in Indonesia.  Currently, she is performing a joint residency in laboratory animal medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and PhD at the Center for Alternatives to Animal Testing.  Her dissertation focuses on developing a microgliacontaining hiPSCderived cerebral organoid model to assess developmental neurotoxicity.  Additionally, she actively works to facilitate increased refinement for laboratory rodents and rabbits, including the use of less invasive experimental techniques, pre-- operative temperament assessment to improve anesthesia, and the implementation of playpens.

 

kleinsteuer sub

Kleinstreuer, Nicole NIH, NIEHS, USA ICCVAM Interagency Initiatives on Consideration and Validation of Alternative Methods

Dr. Nicole C. Kleinstreuer began her role as Acting Director of the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM) in 2020. NICEATM conducts data analyses, workshops, independent validation studies, and other activities to assess new, revised, and alternative test methods and strategies and provides support for the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM). Kleinstreuer leads NICEATM ’ s computational toxicology work, helps provide oversight of the NICEATM support contract, and works towards achieving the ICCVAM goals as articulated in the ICCVAM Authorization Act of 2000. She also holds a secondary appointment in the NIEHS Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch. Prior to joining NTP, Kleinstreuer worked for Integrated Laboratory Systems, Inc., as a senior staff computational toxicologist and director of the ILS computational toxicology group supporting NICEATM. Kleinstreuer received her Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, and B.S. degrees in mathematics and biomedical engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNCCH). Prior to joining ILS, she completed postdoctoral training at the EPA National Center for Computational Toxicology. Kleinstreuer also maintains an adjunct faculty appointment at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy at UNCNunamaker, Elizabeth Charles River Laboratories, USA CH. ICCVAM Interagency Initiatives on Consideration and Validation of Alternative Methods Nicole C. Kleinstreuer, Ph.D., began her role as Acting Director of the NTP Interagency Center for the Evaluation of Alternative Toxicological Methods (NICEATM) in 2020. NICEATM conducts data analyses, workshops, independent validation studies, and other activities to assess new, revised, and alternative test methods and strategies and provides support for the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods (ICCVAM). Kleinstreuer leads NICEATM ’ s computational toxicology work, helps provide oversight of the NICEATM support contract, and works towards achieving the ICCVAM goals as articulated in the ICCVAM Authorization Act of 2000. She also holds a secondary appointment in the NIEHS Biostatistics and Computational Biology Branch. Prior to joining NTP, Kleinstreuer worked for Integrated Laboratory Systems, Inc., as a senior staff computational toxicologist and director of the ILS computational toxicology group supporting NICEATM. Kleinstreuer received her Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, and B.S. degrees in mathematics and biomedical engineering from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNCCH). Prior to joining ILS, she completed postdoctoral training at the EPA National Center for Computational Toxicology. Kleinstreuer also maintains an adjunct faculty appointment at the Eshelman School of Pharmacy at UNCCH.

 

Ekaterina

Rivera, Ekaterina Akimovna Botovchenco 

Dr. Rivera is an emeritus researcher at the Laboratory Animal House at the University of Goiás, where she was director for 30 years. She earned her D.V.M. at the University of Rio Grande do Sul- Brazil and her M.Sc. in Laboratory Animals Science in the Royal Veterinary College at the University of London. 

Currently, she is coordinator of CONCEA, the Brazilian Council on the Control of Animal Experiments from the Brazilian Ministry of Science and Technology. Instrumental in the establishment of Brazil’s first Ethical Committee on Animal Experiments as well as subsequent ethical committees in universities across Brazil. 

Paramount in the approval of the Brazilian Law on the use of experimental animals. She was Instrumental in the establishment of Brazil’s first Ethical Committee on Animal Experiments as well as subsequent ethical committees in universities across Brazil. This work furthered the approval of the Brazilian Law on the use of experimental animals. Her areas of expertise are lecturing on animal welfare, assessing animal facilities, and teaching laboratory animal science at numerous universities. She developed the first courses on laboratory animal science in Brazil. 

 

rosshart

Rosshart, Stephan University Medical Center Freiburg, Germany How Wild Mouse Gut Microbiota Promote Host Fitness and Makes a Better Model for Immune System Research

Dr. Rosshart studied biology and medicine at the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany. In 2010 he obtained his doctorate degree in basic immunological research with "summa cum laude" from the University of Freiburg. After his postgraduate training in clinical internal medicine at the University Medical Center Freiburg, he joined the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, USA for a 6-year postdoctoral fellowship in basic immunological research. During this time, he conceived the "natural microbiota theory" which he published corresponding author in the journals Cell (2017) and Science (2019). In 2019 he took his new position as academic physician scientist and group leader of the translational microbiome research laboratory at the Department of Medicine II, University Medical Center Freiburg. His work focuses on mammalian microbiota and their impact on health and disease. He utilizes natural microbiota- and pathogen-based mouse models and a bench-to-bedside approach to identify new treatment strategies for human diseases.   

 

 

Souilem

Souelem, Ouajdi

Dr. Ouajdi Souelem earned his veterinary degree from the National Veterinary School, Sidi Thabet (Tunisia) in 1986 and obtained his PhD from University of Nantes (France) in 1998. Author of about 50 scientific articles and papers in indexed journals in the field of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Animal Welfare.

He is the Tunisian national representative since 1998 at ICLAS (International Council for Laboratory Animal Science); the acting chair of ICLAS Africa Region Committee (2019-2023); and in charge of liaison with OIE/ WHAO.

His previous positions include: member of the ad hoc Committee of Laboratory Animal Welfare, OIE Paris (2007-2011); president and founder of ATSAL “Tunisian Association for LAS” (2007), and the president of the National Committee on Ethics on Animal Experimentation at the Ministry of Higher Education and Scientific Research, Tunisia (2017-2020).

Professor Ouajdi Souilem is also the acting president of the Animal Ethics Committee (AEC/IACUC at ENMV), and member of the international Group: ONE WELFARE PHOENIX.

In 2020, he created the Tunisian Society for Animal Welfare and other experts to offer scientific and technical support to the field of animal welfare in Tunisia.

Professor Ouajdi Souilem is the Tunisian coordinator of the Twinning OIE project between IZSAM-Italy and ENMV-Tunisia titled Animal Welfare in Tunisia and North Africa (2021-2024), and he is invited in June 2022 to participate in the network of Animal Welfare Collaborating Centres at World Health Animal Organisation.

 

walker 

Walker, Mike

Dr. Mike Walker obtained his PhD from the University of Guelph in Animal Behaviour and Welfare. His graduate work concentrated on promoting reduction and refinement for laboratory mice used in science through improved experimental design, as well as developing novel tools for assessing mouse motivation for various enrichment items.  After graduation, he began working at the Canadian Council on Animal Care (CCAC) as a Senior Research Analyst.  More recently, he has been working at CCAC as a Standards Development Director developing guidelines for the ethical care and use of animals in Canadian science.

Wurbel small

Würbel, Hanno

Dr. Wurbel studied Biology at the University of Bern and earned a PhD at ETH Zürich. After postdoc positions at Bristol University, ETH Zürich, and University of Zürich, he became Professor of Animal Welfare and Ethology at the University of Giessen in Germany in 2002. In 2011, he became chair for Animal Welfare at the University of Bern.

He obtained several awards for his work on the 3Rs and reproducibility of animal research. They were the Creativity Award of the International Society for Applied Ethology (2015), the CAAT Excellence in Refinement Award (2017), and the 3R Reduction Award of the Swiss Society for Laboratory Animal Science (2019).

He is active in various committees to promote ethically responsible and scientifically valid research, as the coauthor of the ARRIVE 2.0 Guidelines and the US Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals; as chair of the Ethics Committee for Animal Experimentation (ECAE) of the Swiss Academies of Arts and Sciences; as Executive Board member of the Swiss 3R Competence Centre; and as a founding member of the Swiss Reproducibility Network.